Self-Compassion for Catholic Women

Seeing yourself through the eyes of God

Self-Compassion for Catholic Women

Seeing yourself through
the eyes of God

Are any of these true of you?

You are kind and compassionate towards friends, but disapproving and judgmental when you talk to yourself

You struggle to forgive yourself for sins, mistakes, and unkindness

You were raised to keep a ‘stiff upper lip,’ stop complaining, and carry on

You spend more time focusing on your weaknesses than you do appreciating your good qualities

It’s hard for you to bounce back from failures and disappointments

You tell yourself to ‘just get over it’

You get impatient and frustrated with aspects of your personality you dislike

You say, “I should be more grateful. Others are suffering much more than I am.”

Though many of us assume these patterns to be “normal”, they are signs that you lack self-compassion and may struggle to receive God’s compassion for you. In Jesus, we do not see a God who is critical and judgmental, but a God who is moved by our suffering, shares in our pain, and tenderly meets us in our brokenness.

“Compassion is such a deep, central, and powerful emotion in Jesus that it can only be described as a movement of the womb of God. In Hebrew, rachamim.”

Henri  Nouwen

If you could see yourself through the eyes of God,
it might look something like this:

You turn toward difficult emotions and situations instead of avoiding, resisting, or denying reality

You invite God into your challenges and receive his compassion and care

You reflect on your experience of suffering without feeling sorry for yourself

You accept your imperfections with humility while continuing to grow and change

You can receive the forgiveness of God and let go of failures

You reflect on your experience of suffering without feeling sorry for yourself

You acknowledge the suffering of yourself and others without comparing, belittling, or rejecting it

You can let go of past guilt and regrets that no longer serve a purpose

You accept yourself as a beautiful and flawed human being, loved by God

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What Is Self-Compassion?

Self-compassion is the skill of directing the same type of kindness, care, and compassion toward yourself that you would convey toward a loved one who is suffering. This means treating yourself kindly even when things go wrong.

 

If you fail at something, you can still be kind to yourself.

 

If you make a mistake, forget something important, or offend someone,
you can still be kind to yourself.

 

If you make a critical error, you can still be kind to yourself.

 

If your human weakness and your sin show up, you can still be kind to yourself.

Here’s what people are saying about Karen’s self-compassion course:

“This is an amazing course. I want my whole family to take it.”​

“I can’t believe I’m in my 50s and I’ve never heard about this from my Catholic communities . . .we need this!”

“I really used to just avoid negative feelings and would stuff them in, be hard on myself if I couldn't muscle through something. Now I can tell myself that there is probably something I need and I can give that to myself. “

Research shows that people who are good at Self-compassion

Are less:

Critical

Anxious

Judgmental

Fearful

Do less:

Ruminating

Hiding

Avoiding

Self-condemning

Are more:

Resilient

Courageous

Motivated

Hopeful

Do more:

Connecting

Forgiving

Learning

Changing

AND they are better at receiving compassion and giving compassion to others.

God desires you to receive his compassion and 
to have compassion for yourself.
These two things are connected

Research shows that people who are good at Self-compassion

Are less:

Critical

Anxious

Judgmental

Fearful

Do less:

Ruminating

Hiding

Avoiding

Self-condemning

Are more:

Resilient

Courageous

Motivated

Hopeful

Do more:

Connecting

Forgiving

Learning

Changing

AND they are better at receiving compassion and giving compassion to others.

God desires you to receive his compassion and 
to have compassion for yourself.
These two things are connected

"The truly good news is that God is not a distant God, a God to be feared and avoided, a God of revenge, but a God who is moved by our pains and participates in the fullness of the human struggle."

Henri  Nouwen